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Sleep Positions To Save Your Back

October 2, 2018

 

Sleep drives your day, affecting everything from energy levels to mood, soreness to alertness. We take a look at how to put your body in the best position for the best rest possible. 

 

We took a look at how to get to bed ready to fall asleep, but what's the best physical position to adopt? For most of us, our sleeping position is nearly fixed; if we aren't in our usual pose, we can't fall asleep at all! If you do have a little elasticity, it's worth trying to adopt a better position to help protect your neck and spine. 

 

Get Back. Though it's by far the best for your spine, less than 10% of people actually sleep on your their back. This allows for the most neutral pressure from your neck, spine, and hips, as well as keeping your digestive system in a better position to avoid indigestion. The only drawback can be a big one; back sleepers tend to make snoring more severe, if present. 

 

Side to Side. Far more people can sleep on one side or the other. Because it helps keep your spine elongated, it's a close runner-up to your back as a sleeping position. About 15% of adults sleep this way, although there is one drawback; sleeping with your face on the pillow does contribute to wrinkles! 

 

Like A Baby. You might be surprised to learn that the fetal position is by far the most popular for most adults. At 41%, it's the go-to sleep posture. It helps promote stretching and circulation,and it's the doctor's suggested position for pregnant women, too. If you do sleep on your side, try putting a pillow between your legs to reduce strain on your hips. 

 

Stomach Time. If you can, this is position is one you should try to fix. It's been shown to put much more pressure on your back, especially your neck from lying with your head turned. That pressure can also lead to numbness in the extremities, as well as adding pressure on your digestive system. Only about 7% of adults sleep this way, but if you're one of that number, make an effort to try something new. Trying for a week or two can lead to big changes! 

 

Do you think your neck or back pain might be caused by your sleeping position? Stop by and let's talk about the best solutions for you! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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